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Posts tagged "Employment Disputes"

What are work search requirements for unemployment compensation?


People in California who lose their jobs and believe they are entitled to unemployment benefits must be fully aware of the various rules that dictate both receiving and retaining those benefits. In some instances, there might be a misunderstanding of what the recipient is required to do to get the benefits. In others, there could be a disagreement with employers over a multitude of issues that are linked to unemployment compensation. Regardless, there are work search requirements that a person who is receiving benefits must follow.

Legal help with defamation from employers in California


When California employees are having problems at a job, the issues that result from it can go beyond simply being dismissed or leaving as a matter of choice. There is the possibility that negative statements can be made by the employers and harm the person's chances of getting a similar or better job. It can even hurt them in getting any job at all. If the victim suspects that this is going, that person should be aware that he or she has options of counteracting it.

Legal help for private sector employment disputes


In California, every worker is accorded certain rights and protections. Some employees who are working in the public sector may have a better grasp of their rights regarding workplace issues, such as breach of contract. For private sector employees, issues such as contract disputes along with other workplace issues can be complicated and lead to confusion leaving workers unsure of what to do if they are affected. Having legal assistance that is specifically dedicated to helping those who work in the private sector with a unique understanding of the various aspects that are involved is key if there is a disagreement.

What can pregnant employees expect for leave and return?


When a California employee is pregnant, she might have a vague understanding of her rights under the law when it comes to duties at work, time off and other issues. It is important to note, however, that state law is specific about what pregnant employees can expect when it comes to receiving salary and benefits during pregnancy leave as well as what their return rights are. Employment disputes frequently arise because of pregnancy. Knowing these rights under the law can potentially keep employers from taking liberties against pregnant employees and provide a guideline to seeking compensation if there is a violation.

Number of employees filing winning claims over eldercare growing


California employees need to fully understand their rights under federal and state laws when it comes to various aspects of their employment. For example, employees may be confused about what is and is not allowed to when it comes to taking leave to care for a family member. But they should know that employers are required to provide a certain amount of time off to an employee if there is a sick loved one at home that requires the employee's attention. If an employer does not provide the required time off, or punishes the employee for exercising their rights to take that time off, even if it is unpaid, this can be the foundation for a legal filing.

Critics blast latest civil service reform effort by House

Government work does not tend to be sexy. Very often it is fraught with political overtones. It's because of the pressures on that front that the civil service system exists. It's meant to provide federal employees with a set of due process procedures to ensure they don't fall victim to any form of discrimination, including political.

Is CA Labor Commissioner's Office behind the times?

The notion that a fair day's work is worth a fair day's pay is something that the labor movement has promoted for a long time. And in California, the concept has been codified into law in different ways. One example is that overtime gets paid for any work over eight hours in a day. The general rule in much of the country only grants OT for work over 40 hours in a week.

Employers can be held accountable for employment law violations

It can be very stressful when California employees are treated unfairly at their places of employment. This is especially true when a worker's financial stability is affected. It is not always easy to decide to sue an employer, though professional help is available to deal with these challenging issues effectively. All employers have a duty to treat their workers fairly under the law.