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What benefits is my employer required to provide?

As an employee, most people are probably aware that they have some very basic rights and if their employer violates these rights they may take legal action. However, if you are now, or have ever, searched for a job, you likely know that one of the very important factors to take into consideration is benefits. What benefits does your employer offer? What benefits are employers required by law to offer all of their employees?

These are very important questions to consider as an employee, and it is essential to understand what benefits you are entitled to so that you can hold an employer accountable if these benefits are not being properly provided. Whether you work for a small business or a large corporation, the law requires employers to carry at least the minimum required employee benefits. There are several mandates, such as the Affordable Care Act and ERISA, that lay out these requirements.

For instance, all states require employers that meet certain qualifications to provide family and medical leave for employees. Outside of family and medical leave, employers are not required to offer paid time off for employees; however this is standard practice among most employers. Under federal law, all employers are also required by law to pay unemployment insurance taxes for every full time and part time employee.

In addition to the federal regulations, the types and amounts of required benefits may vary by state. For instance, some states require employers to provide short term and long-term disability benefits. The employee benefits required can vary based on a variety of circumstances as well as state regulations. It is important to consult with an experienced employment law attorney to ensure that your rights as an employee are being protected and you are receiving the employee benefits that you are entitled to.

Source: Thebalancecareers.com, Required v. Non-required Employee Benefits for US Businesses, Tess Taylor, April 12, 2018, accessed May 08, 2018.