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Fired Benghazi panel investigator claims wrongful termination

The federal government employs a huge number of people. Except for the few positions that are filled by presidential appointment, politics isn't supposed to be a factor in who gets and keeps a job.

That is certainly the ideal. And there are federal laws on the books meant to protect federal workers from unfair treatment that results in their being fired for unlawful reasons. Unfortunately, politics often plays a role in what happens in the workplace. And it doesn't matter whether the environment is in the public or the private sector.

An employee might find it hard to fight dismissal on the basis of suspected politics from a private company. But the battle might tend to be a little easier to wage in government. Regardless of the situation, however, workers in Southern California who have suffered retaliatory firing should know their rights by consulting with an experienced employment attorney.

This all comes to mind in light of recent stories out of Washington that involve a former investigator for the House Select Committee on the tragic terror attack on a U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, that left four Americans dead.

As readers are surely aware, the committee is headed up by Republican lawmakers. Some in the GOP majority have openly suggested that eroding Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton's aspirations has been one of the panel's goals.

Those motives reportedly didn't sit well with the self-proclaimed Republican investigator Bradley Podliska. In addition to being an experienced intelligence investigator, Podliska is a major in the Air Force Reserve.

He was fired from his committee investigation job earlier this month and is now said to be preparing to sue for wrongful termination. The action is reportedly based on two claims of unlawful action. The first is that he was let go because he had taken leave to fulfill military obligations with the National Guard. The second is that higher ups weren't happy that Podliska had complained about the political agenda of the Benghazi committee's majority members.

The committee denies both claims and says if anyone showed political bias it was Podliska.

Whether the suit has been filed isn't apparent from news coverage to date. But the nature of rhetoric coming from the two sides suggests the court forum may be the only way to reach resolution.